Planet Badges

Badger Beats: The Week In Review [69]

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Sat Dec 13 2014 12:46:33 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Welcome to the Badger Beats! We’re excited to share this week’s round of news and updates with you:

A couple of community reminders:

1. We’re putting together a Tiki Toki timeline of Open Badges for 2014 (check out last year’s timeline!) If you or your organization have badging milestones you’d like us to include in this year’s timeline, let our Marketing + Community Manager know at jade@badgealliance.org

2. If you participated in Hour of Code, Badge List is offering open badges (awesome!)

See you next week, badgers!

Open Badges Community Project Call, December 10, 2014

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Sat Dec 13 2014 12:17:20 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Open Badges Community Project Call, December 10, 2014:

Speakers:

Agenda:

This week, superbadgers Nate and Serge shared their recent collaboration on a presentation for the Open Education Conference held in Washington, D.C. in November. The session, titled “An API of one’s own: Individual Identities as First-Class Citizens in the Open Badges Infrastructure,” looked at issues of trust, identity and symmetry in the badging ecosystem. They reviewed their presentation and gave the community the opportunity to dive deeper into some questions raised during the presentation.

Badges as currency

Open Badges are “a common portable language about data,” providing information on a skill or knowledge as well as those earning and issuing it. Serge argues that Open Badges are “declarations of trust,” and that this shift in thinking affects both badge system design and how badges are used in particular environments.

Currently, badges are part of what Serge describes as “trust silos,” where an issuer is at the center and trusts numerous earners (see above). This conflicts with the narrative of Open Badges, which states that the earner is at the center of the ecosystem. In that narrative, we have often talked about badges as a “new currency” for skills and knowledge in the 21st century. Serge made the point that it could be said that badges are a visible representation of the oldest currency: trust. By thinking of badges as tokens of trust, we can address those who have concerns about dilution if there are ‘too many badges’ in the ecosystem or in a particular earner’s backpack / portfolio.

To dig deeper into the issues of trust within badging interactions, Nate and Serge examined the three roles performed and the necessary assets to perform those roles:

Issuer:

  • has to sign up with a platform to create badges, or create JSON assertions themselves;
  • has the capacity to create more as more badges are earned

Earner:

  • needs an email address;
  • needs a Persona account if they are using the Mozilla Backpack;
  • might want or need various display options for their badges

Consumer:

  • needs enough education, understanding and/or familiarity with Open Badges to be able to interpret and distinguish between badges;
  • needs the necessary time and tools to dig into badges

These three roles are built on very different different technologies, making it difficult to move between roles. Earlier this year, Mark Surman compared the current state of badges with the early days of email: a small number of issuers with huge potential to grow into a global network. The key difference is that all email users use the same tool to send and receive emails, whereas badging still relies on piecing together many different tools with varying functionality.

Nate and Serge posed the question of how to align badges with our philosophy of an earner-centered system, by building these values into the Open Badges Standard and software. Doing this would break down the silos of trust Serge described above and instead create visible chains of trust. There are two proposed models to help build this network: Nate and a team from Concentric Sky, Oregon Center for Digital Learning and the Oregon Badge Alliance are working on a trust ecosystem project, which includes a 3-faceted application for issuers, earners and consumers of open badges.

The initial pilot will focus on 12 programs, including workforce development, conferences, K-12 and out-of-school learning environments. The project will see further development, testing and refining in 2015, but is aimed at enabling connectivity among enterprise issuing platforms and independent services, connecting to other badge-aware services on the web, with software and support for all 3 badging roles, making it easier for users to move between them.

Serge, in a partnership between Discendum Oy, Badge Europe and Europortfolio, is working on an open badges passport that acts as a basic portfolio where anyone can earn and issue badges. This passport can then be built up with endorsements and other trust-building add-ons, as well as a ‘dashboard’ of stats on badges earned, issued, pledged, etc., contributing to the growth of a social network around badges. If everyone used a passport for receiving and issuing badges, Serge argues, it would build a trust network in which the barriers between roles of issuer, earner and consumer are significantly lower.

To learn more about the projects described here, check out Nate and Serge’s slides from their Open Ed presentation here.

You can also see the full discussion notes on the agenda, linked at the top of this post.

Open Badges MOOC: The Year In Review

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Fri Dec 12 2014 14:12:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Badges: New Currency for Professional Credentials
Session 13: The Year In Review
#openbadgesMOOC

Recording: http://bit.ly/OBmoocEOY

This week the Badge Alliance team led the live MOOC session, going over highlights from the year. Check out the slide deck above, as well as this overview of Cycle 1 to see a neat infographic of the working groups’ deliverables and other major milestones the badges community hit this year.

The MOOC recording will be available from badges.coursesites.com soon.

Cycle 1 Deliverables

Here’s a quick overview of each Working Group’s successful deliverables from this cycle:

Open Badges Standard:

  • Researched and experimented with technology options for implementing extensions to BadgeClass and BadgeAssertion
  • Proposed an extension solution that is open to the community to experiment with,  comment and iterate on.
  • Joined W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) Credentialing Community Group

Open Badges Infrastructure (OBI):

  • Formed a Tech Advisory Council to act in an advisory role to the Badge Alliance and guide the ongoing development of the open badges technical infrastructure
  • Drafted an Open Badges Infrastructure strategy

Endorsement:

  • Drafted a working paper on conceptual approaches to badge endorsement
  • Released initial technical implementation proposal in collaboration with the Open Badge Standard Working Group

Directory:

  • Launched a working beta of an Open Badges Directory that makes it possible for learners and other organizations to find and connect to various badge issuers, their badges and their programs
  • Released accompanying tutorials and documentation

Research:

Messaging:

Digital & Web Literacies:

  • Launched Learning Pathways for Privacy
  • Began building badges for privacy pathway
  • Initiated Web Literacy Map 2.0

Globalization:

Higher Education:

Workforce:

Badges for Educators & Professional Development:

Cities & Network-wide Badge Systems:

  • Launched Cities of Learning site
  • Implemented in four cities: Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas and Pittsburgh

Policy (launched in September 2014):

Badger Beats: The Week In Review [68]

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Sat Dec 06 2014 16:42:32 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Hey there, badgers! We’ve got a few things to catch you up on this weekend:

Don’t forget to let us know if you think you’re eligible for any of the Badge Alliance badges.

We hope everyone has a lovely weekend - get ready for the holidays, wrap up warm, and beware those pre-Christmas sales (or at least the revolving department store doors!)

In case you missed the Policy 101 webinar hosted by the Penn...

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Sat Dec 06 2014 12:57:10 GMT+0000 (UTC)



In case you missed the Policy 101 webinar hosted by the Penn Hill Group team on Thurs, Dec. 4, here’s the recording on our YouTube channel.

Slides can be found here: http://bit.ly/PolicySlides

More information on the Badge Alliance Policy Working Group: http://badgealliance.org/policy

Open Badges Community Call, December 3, 2014

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Fri Dec 05 2014 14:20:55 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Open Badges Community Call, December 3, 2014:

Speaker:

Agenda:

Before we kicked off this week’s presentation from Jeff Colombe, we heard from our Directory whizz, Kerri Lemoie, who gave the community some updates from the Directory project. The call attendees raised some great questions about next steps for the Open Badges Directory, including taxonomy, a take-down or ‘opt-out’ mechanism for the registry, and who can add badges. See the full discussion on lines 69-156 in the call notes: http://bit.ly/CC-Dec3

Badges for Talent Management

Jeff Colombe works in the Emerging Technologies Department at the MITRE Corporation, a not-for-profit technology company operating several federally funded research and development centers. MITRE frequently works with various organizations to try to connect technology with whose who can use it best, including other not-for-profits as well as for-profit companies.

Jeff, like many others, saw how badges were being used in education and was interested to see how badges could be used to aid the hiring process in the workplace. Jeff’s project is Skillset, a talent management project undertaken during the last two years at MITRE to match people to project work based on skills, expertise and interests.

There is a “marketplace” for work at MITRE: project managers need to find people to do work, and employees need to find enough work so that they don’t have to bill their vacation hours. Skillset is essentially a MITRE-specific job skills inventory. Employees can fill out a profile of practical and soft skills, working styles, etc., all of which are graded by levels of both expertise and interest. These skills profiles can then be voluntarily verified (endorsed) by a manager, task leader or co-worker. When job roles are listed, they include a list of skills categorized by level and necessity, then employees’ profiles are cross-referenced to show their expertise in those particular skills, allowing for fast connections between those who have the skills and the roles they can fill.

Several factors will affect the long-term success of Skillset, according to Jeff:

  • Adoption: currently there are only 2 user groups at MITRE that have completed their job profiles; more widespread adoption across the organization is needed to support the project;
  • Content quality: as the user community continues using the inventory and adding skills to the database, the most desirable and valuable skills will be revealed;
  • Incorporating Skillset into business practices: there are legal issues related to data privacy and the sharing of information that might present a hurdle to the widespread adoption of the Skillset program;
  • Merging with other services / platforms: Jeff is exploring the potential uses of Skillset as a plug-in for HR software and a web service to be used globally

Learn more about Skillset in Jeff’s white paper: http://bit.ly/SkillsetWhitePaper

Jeff’s presentation slides can be found here.

The Badge Alliance at MozFest

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Tue Dec 02 2014 17:59:11 GMT+0000 (UTC)

By Jade Forester

At this year’s MozFest, the Badge Alliance was represented by three team members—Carla Casilli led a research-focused session and held office hours throughout the festival weekend, and Sunny Lee and I sat down with a group of attendees to dig into this year’s accomplishments and start to look at areas in need of attention in the coming year.

WGs.jpg

We used the Cycle 1 Working Groups as a starting point, focusing on each to identify gaps still to be filled in key areas of both the infrastructure that supports Open Badges and the growing ecosystem that expands adoption of badges. Upon our return from MozFest, we brought our notes from this group exercise to the Community Call, inviting attendees to add their thoughts. These conversations helped clarify the most critical issues facing the open badges community as we continue to push this work forward.

Here’s what we found

Employers will be the key to widespread adoption

Workers need jobs. Employers need talent. Badges can help workers showcase their full skill sets and allow employers to identify candidates with the right qualifications and competencies. This has been part of the Open Badges narrative since day one, and as we see increased adoption of badges within education, the next step is to help more employers see the value proposition in using badges to differentiate between job applicants and identify those with the right skill set. Without employer buy-in, badges earned for academic or professional skills cannot have meaning outside of the issuing environment.

During Cycle 1 the Workforce Working Group developed an Employer FAQ, identified a list of existing workforce badge use cases, and created an employer pipeline graphic for Open Badges. Expanded badging piloting and documentation particularly as part of the hiring and training processes, will lead to increased employer acceptance. It will also enhance the value of existing badges, especially the badges that align with industry standards in particular fields.

Some members of the community indicated that veterans separating from the military will play an increasingly important role in workforce, therefore focusing badge activity and adoption in this area could potentially yield great success—not only for the veterans but also for employers. Continued efforts will be needed to support open badges initiatives aimed at connecting veterans with civilian employment opportunities.

We need to keep pushing for badges in higher education

Badges are steadily gaining a foothold in higher education as a way for instructors to recognize a wider range of skills and achievements than traditional credentials allows - institutions such as UC Davis are using badges as a supplement to traditionally graded programs. Others are pushing the envelope even further, such as Dr. Bernard Bull at Concordia University Wisconsin, who has developed a master’s program in education technology based entirely on competency-based digital badges. Many are still reluctant to integrate badges into their courses; the Campus Policy Framework Document developed by the Policy Working Group will help more institutions find a way to make badges work for them.

Continued collaboration by the community will be increasingly important as more educational bodies and institutions start to explore and adopt badges. The Higher Education Working Group started curating a list of examples of badges in higher education - if you know of more, add them to the list!

Continued research is vital

Building on a quickly developing base of ongoing open badges investigation, the Open Badges Research strives to establish a research base that reports on a variety of open badges aspects. A nice progression from the Research & Badge System Design Calls, now with a stronger emphasis on traditional academic research, this group covers the entire realm of the open badges ecosystem, and actively works to provide the public with meaningful information about open badges.The group’s foundational landscape survey—developed with IRB review and exemption granted from the University of Michigan (thanks Steve Lonn!)—will help badge researchers find future areas of focus. By coalescing, investigating, and funneling research activity into accessible locations, the research community will continue to expand on this meaningful research base that benefits the entire ecosystem.

Global Cities of Learning will bring badges to communities around the world

2014 has truly been a year of global growth for Open Badges. Initiatives such as Badge The UK have continued to raise awareness of badges in the UK; European badging projects have seen increased activity in France, Finland, Serbia, Spain, and Germany; and Down Under, the OBANZ community has formed to support the research, development and adoption of Open Badges in Australia and New Zealand.

The Cities of Learning initiative grew from one summer program in 2013 to six summer and year-round initiatives in 2014. Now that there is increased global badging activity, international cities are starting to investigate the value of using badges to recognize youth activity. Partnerships with local governments and community leaders will be the key to developing an international Cities of Learning movement—the driving force will come from the communities, not from outside influences.

The Open Badges Standard is really important

The Open Badges Standard and technical infrastructure (OBI) are the lynchpins that hold the ecosystem together: their importance can’t be understated, and the community recognizes this. There are several issues that the badges team and community have been working on that are in need of continuing efforts, including:

  • The Backpack: The community has requested that the Mozilla Backpack receive continued attention to address bugs and find solutions to common problems such as sign-on identities, and to get us closer to backpack federation, which Chris McAvoy has written about extensively. Other backpack options are also starting to emerge - Serge Ravet and Nate Otto will be presenting a peer-to-peer Open Badge Passport at the OpenEd Conference in late November, and Digital Me’s Tim Riches led a brainstorming session at MozFest to gather ideas for a ‘next generation backpack’ maintained by a dedicated team of developers.

  • The Directory: The Directory Working Group, led by Achievery’s Kerri Lemoie, released an initial prototype of the Open Badges Directory during Cycle 1. There’s still a lot of work ahead for the directory to live up to its full potential, and the group is eager to tackle a number of key focus areas, including: listing badge instances in addition to badge classes; additional API endpoints; and exploring ways to lower the barrier of entry for badge issuers while still clearly articulating the value of open badges. Read more over on Sunny’s blog.

  • Endorsement: Endorsement will be a game changer in terms of how badges are used, understood, and trusted, because it allows third-party organizations to publicly indicate which badges are aligned with their values and are therefore most meaningful and useful to them, Working closely with the the Standard Working Group, the Endorsement Working Group produced the initial technical implementation proposal to support badge endorsement. The conceptual framework for digital badge endorsement is outlined in the Endorsement Working Group’s seminal working paper. Ongoing technical development for badge endorsement will allow badge adoption to reach a critical tipping point, encouraging the further development of open badges trust networks.

  • Shareability: The portability of the badge has been an integral part of the narrative since day one, but making that experience more intuitive is something the community is in need of. This includes being able to easily share badges on LinkedIn, as the biggest professional network on the web, as well as easy integration with online résumés and digital portfolios. While the community have found a number of workarounds, collaboration with critical players will be the key to making this a smoother process.

  • Building technical resources: As an open source project, Open Badges relies on a vibrant community of volunteers to report and fix bugs in Github; encouraging technically-minded folks to get involved will be an ongoing need for the community to address. As other organizations work to build out badging platforms, a connected network of resources will help the ecosystem continue to grow without each newcomer having to start from scratch.

Get involved: be the change you wish to see

We’ve identified a number of important areas for community contribution over the coming months. None of them were particularly surprising; these are issues we’ve been talking about for a while now. We’ve already achieved so much—if you haven’t already checked out the overview of our successes from Cycle 1, do it now—but there is still much more work to be done.

The exciting part is, the work has already begun. No-one has to start from scratch, and there is a thriving community ready to support and collaborate with you. We started this work the same way we’ll accomplish the things we outlined above: as a community.



Badger Beats: The Week In Review [67]

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Fri Nov 21 2014 20:32:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Hey there folks,

We were thrilled to issue Badge Alliance badges this week - if you think you’re eligible but haven’t gotten yours yet, let us know.

Lots of community members have been out and about this week at various conferences, including Open Ed, Global Education Conference, and the Pittsburgh Learning Pathways Summit - the #openbadges hashtag on Twitter is a good way to find conversations from other events.

What else happened this week?

That’s it from us, folks! Enjoy your weekend, and we’ll catch up with everyone for a couple of days next week before we break for Thanksgiving.

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Badge Alliance Badges are here!

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Fri Nov 21 2014 15:38:57 GMT+0000 (UTC)

The Badge Alliance is pleased to announce the first set of open badges designed to recognize the diligent work and meaningful contributions that Working Group members have made to the global open badges movement throughout Cycle 1. We’re excited to say that all of the email notifications for these badges have been sent and that these badges are beginning to be claimed by their earners.

If, after reading the badge descriptions and criteria below, you believe that you are eligible for one or more of these badges and you haven’t heard from us, email badges@badgealliance.org to let us know which badge(s) you have earned. Please include the criteria you’ve met, as well as any evidence supporting your application. Thank you!

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Badge Alliance Community Member

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This badge acknowledges general membership in the Open Badges community and participation ranging from activity in the Google group to joining weekly community calls.

Criteria:

The Community Member illustrates conceptual fortitude by signing up for at least one of the mailing lists to interact with the Open Badges community.

Potential Evidence:

  • Subscribes to one or more Working Group mailing list or the Open Badges Community Group
  • Interacts with the Open Badges community via Twitter or Facebook

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Badge Alliance Working Group Contributor

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This badge acknowledges Open Badges community members who have actively attended conferences, or participated in mailing lists, working groups, or community calls.

Criteria:

The Contributor helps to build the open badges ecosystem through active participation in the Working Group or community calls and mailing lists.

Potential Evidence:

  • Subscribes to one or more Working Group mailing list or the Open Badges Community Group
  • Attends weekly Community Calls or Working Group calls
  • Contributes to Working Group etherpads
  • Participates in mailing list discussions

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Badge Alliance Working Group Fellow

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This badge acknowledges those who go above and beyond in their contributions to the Open Badges community.

Criteria:

The Fellow displays community-building characteristics, reinforces new ideas about assessment, learning and credentialing, and champions open badges in their respective areas of expertise.

Potential Evidence:

  • Held a leadership role in a Working Group (Chair, Cabinet Member, Secretary)
  • Active participation in the Open Badges MOOC
  • Regularly updates the Badge Alliance team and community on their badge activity
  • Speaks on panels with Badge Alliance members
  • Presents their work on Working Group Calls or Community Calls

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Open Badges Advocate

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This badge acknowledges individuals who regularly champion Open Badges through active blogging, writing, research, or speaking at conferences.

Criteria:

The Advocate exhibits depth and breadth of knowledge about Open Badges in their writing, research, or presentations.

Potential Evidence:

  • Regularly speaks about Open Badges at conferences, on panels, in workshops, etc.
  • Actively writes or blogs about badges
  • Conducts and publishes research into badges

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Badge Alliance Visionary

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This badge acknowledges individuals who have altered the landscape of Open Badges through innovative work in research, coding, or badge system design and implementation.

Criteria:

The Visionary makes it possible for others to see the tremendous potential in the open badges movement.

Potential Evidence:

  • Forges new paths for open badges adoption
  • Suggests new approached to alternative credentialing
  • Questions normative understandings of learning, assessment, research, and so-called traditional learning pathways
  • Contributes code, research, and badge system design and implementation in innovative ways

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Badge Alliance Founding Member

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This badge acknowledges individuals who played an important role in helping to found the Badge Alliance.

Criteria:

The Founding Members helped to establish the Badge Alliance as a nexus of badge innovation and thereby increased the reach of the open badges ecosystem through their support.

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Claim Your Badges

We’ve made every effort to appropriately issue these badges.

If you think you might be eligible for one or more of these badges, and you haven’t heard from us, email badges@badgealliance.org to let us know which badge(s) you have earned. Please include the criteria you’ve met, as well as any evidence supporting your application.

If you’ve been awarded badges to the wrong email address, please email badges@badgealliance.org to let us know which badge(s) you have earned and your preferred email address (the one your Backpack is associated with).

Thank you!

Open Badges Community Project Call, November 19, 2014

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Thu Nov 20 2014 18:45:22 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Open Badges Community Project Call, November 19, 2014:

Speaker:

Agenda:

This week Sheryl Grant joined the community call to discuss findings from initial research into the 30 winners of the 2011 Badges for Lifelong Learning Competition administered by HASTAC in partnership with Mozilla (funded by MacArthur Foundation).

These 30 project teams won funding for one year, to develop their proposed badging projects, many of which were built starting in fall 2012. Sheryl and her team asked each project group a series of questions at various stages in the projects’ development to find common lessons learned and stumbling blocks to badge system development in the early days of the open badging ecosystem. She was particularly interested to see whether the projects that were designed to be more ‘functional’ (meaning they were sustainable in the long term) had particular lessons to share, compared to projects designed to be pilots.

Here were some core lessons learned:

  • People: Partnerships between project teams and other organizations lead to relationship building, but can sometimes prevent progress; many of the badge systems that didn’t make it to ‘functional’ were hindered by issues related to mismatched collaborations
  • Stakeholders: Stakeholders will define the boundaries of a badge system and need to be identified early in the system development, as each stakeholder represents a boundary to be navigated
  • Teachers are stakeholders: The quality of the user experience for teachers will affect their approach to badge systems in educational spaces. It’s important to engage faculty and teachers as co-creators and co-designers of badge systems; initiating early and ongoing training for teachers first is crucial to ensuring their support.
  • Finding a common language: Identifying badge-specific terminology is key to effectively communicating ideas within the project team and to outside contractors and consultants. In response to similar concerns from others in the community, the Badge Alliance Messaging Working Group initiated work on an Open Badges Glossary during Cycle 1
  • Explain badges early: The concept of badges is not always easy for those being introduced to the idea - providing information early and often is key, as well as developing strong user stories about how badges will work
  • Design for relevance: Relevance was a key word that kept reappearing during the project Q+As. Asking learners and stakeholders what they value will help avoid assumptions in the badge system design process and ensure the system is valuable to all involved
  • Build external partnerships: What gives badges weight for stakeholders — Sharing learning pathways? Motivating learners? Or badges holding currency outside of the issuing environment? Identify badges’ value and relevance for stakeholders early in the badge system design process
  • Trust networks: Fostering a collective belief in the value of the badges within and beyond the issuing community is an important part of ecosystem- and trust network-building. Define your trust network of stakeholders and external partners early to ensure the development of a valuable badge system
  • Fail fast: The ‘golden rule’ to badge system design is frequent iteration: testing with real users early and often allows for fixes. Releasing smaller pieces before larger ones also helps build a stronger badge system from the beginning stages of development
  • Learning Pathways: Designing learning pathways is more complex than developing curricula and course requirements; allow enough time for the design and development of badge criteria and pathways. Creating shared assessment criteria might help badges have value and be connected across different programs; so will aligning badges to existing standards, and using tags to make badges more discoverable (for example, by using the badge directory app on Achievery: https://app.achievery.com/discover)
  • User experience (UX): A “clunky” badge system will make badge understanding, earning and sharing more difficult; many project teams said it would be worth the money to get someone who can make the UX intuitive
  • Visual Design: Project teams also said visual design elements should not be underestimated. Overall, simpler designs are better; it’s also important to think about different screen sizes (computers, tablets, mobile)
  • Badge Types: There are different levels and types of badges to be created; careful consideration of learning outcomes and values will guide the badge types each system needs. Experimenting early and keeping things simple will ensure the development of a strong badge system foundation, at which point other features can be developed.
  • Technology: Focus on the technical side of badge system design early; pre-empting technical issues early will allow for agility in re-design. Many projects needed an engineer (and didn’t have one); hiring the best a project team can afford will help if (but usually when) the project comes up against complex technical challenges, particularly when integrating with existing legacy systems

For more detail, check out the full report here: http://dmlhub.net/publications/what-counts-learning

Michigan State University Extension | Digital Badging Series

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Thu Nov 20 2014 15:19:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Jacob Dedecker, an academic specialist at MSU, began a series on digital badges in August 2014. Five parts of the series have been published so far - take a look at the topics covered in the excerpts below:

==================================

Part 1: A bright new way for students to showcase their skills and knowledge

An introduction to digital badges, including an ongoing project with youth participating in a 4-H Renewable Energy Camp:

Youth participating in 4-H Renewable Energy Camp this past June were given the opportunity to earn digital badges in solar energy, wind energy and bioenergy. Youth researched a problem, designed a solution and presented their findings to the entire camp. Learning hot to problem solve, work as a team and communicate are important life skills. In addition, youth engaged in these activities meet certain core science competencies that schools try to teach in the classroom. If youth learn and demonstrate these key competencies during out-of-school time activities like in summer science camps, could they receive credit for that learning? That is one of the key questions this group is asking and digital badging may be a way to do just that.

Read the article in full…

Part 2: What do high school students think of digital badges?

Part 2 looked at how the youth participating in the 4-H Renewable Energy Camp responded to the badges they were earning:

  • 87 percent of students felt that receiving a digital badge validates the knowledge and skills gained at camp.
  • 92 percent of students reported that receiving a digital badge helps document all the knowledge gain; including which takes place outside of school.
  • 89 percent of participants are interested in earning more digital badges in the future.

Read the article in full…

Part 3: Could earning digital badges help young people get a job?

This article explored the potential of badges to help youth find employment opportunities:

As companies look to find the best talent to help their companies thrive, digital badges offer a different view into the experiences, knowledge and skills of candidates they are looking to hire. While grade point averages and ACT scores offer perspective on formal academic achievements, a digital badge can speak to learning experiences and knowledge gained around standards in specific content areas such as solar energy or water quality.

Read the article in full…

Part 4: Could earning digital badges help your child get into college?

This article explored the potential of badges to help youth access academic opportunities:

Are digital badges something post-secondary institutions are looking at to help them determine the best students to admit to their colleges? Digital badges certainly provide another means for students to showcase what they know, the skills they have developed and the experiences they have that would help them be successful in college. Ultimately that is what college admissions are trying to do – identify students that can be successful in their college and departments. However this can be challenging when only looking at a few data points such as GPA and ACT scores, which now carry so much weight in those decisions. Offering another way to feature a student’s academic success and abilities would help students better highlight what they are capable of doing, allowing colleges to make more informed decisions.

Read the article in full…

Part 5: Could digital badges be designed to represent different levels of learning?

This latest article looks badge types and levels, as well as standards that can help badge consumers differentiate between different badges and the learning experiences they represent:

Because digital badges can represent a wide scope of activities, it could be helpful to create a standard that depicts specific types of learning. Even better would be a particular look for badges that connect to a type of learning that can be easily seen by teachers and future employees. The badge style, in essence, would say, “this badge means I learned something significant.”

Read the article in full…

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These articles were published by Michigan State University Extension. For more information, visit http://www.msue.msu.edu.

Badger Beats: The Week In Review [66]

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Fri Nov 14 2014 17:23:52 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Hello there, badgers,

Welcome to the Badger Beats! Here’s a quick run-down of what’s been going on this week:

Have a great weekend, everyone. We’ll catch up with you on Monday!

Open Badges Community Project Call, November 12, 2014

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Thu Nov 13 2014 21:40:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Open Badges Community Project Call, November 12, 2014:

Speaker:

  • Carey Hamburg, University of Louisiana at Lafayette & Lousiana State University

Agenda:

Carey works in the office of Distance Learning at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where they have developed a badge system for their online faculty training program. He is also conducting his doctoral research on digital badges at Louisiana State University, looking at the group of online instructors to see what their perceptions of badges are, and whether they’re at a stage of adoption that would indicate readiness for larger certification programs to make use of badges.

Carey has been encouraged by his graduate committee to look at badging from the viewpoint of the organizations that recruit and hire the instructors that go through the online training. Their reasoning is: regardless of how enthusiastic instructors are about badging, if there aren’t long-term benefits to their careers and job opportunities, a badging system won’t be utilized as much. Conversely, if hiring agents start using - and expecting - badges to play a role in their decisions, then instructors will be increasingly drawn to badged programs. Carey has found little research or commentary on these hypotheses, though he thinks they are correct. He presented his research to the community with a set of questions he was looking to address:

1. What organizations are using badges as part of their hiring process? Are there some case studies already?

The Badge Alliance Workforce Working Group curated a list of examples of open badges and digital badges in the workforce, including early adopters such as Stack Overflow / Careers 2.0, the Manufacturing Institute, and Michigan Mblem badges. If you know of more, add them to the list!

2. What are inhibitors that prevent the adoption (lack of knowledge, lack of trust, “info overload” - etc.)

A lack of awareness and/or knowledge of badges is often the first barrier to adoption within the workforce, as well as concerns about verification and security of badge metadata, and reticence towards trusting a credential within an open ecosystem. Employers often ask specifically about what we call ‘badge overload,’ worrying about how to differentiate between different badges for the same skills and competencies and the time and resources needed to verify multiple badges per job candidate.

Other inhibitors preventing widespread adoption of badges within the workforce include a lack of common skills frameworks across industries, and a lack of technical support (particularly within smaller organizations).

3. How would hiring agents learn about badges and how to interpret and evaluate them? Is there some training available for this new evaluation tool? If not, should there be?

The Workforce Working Group also developed an Employer FAQ and an Employer Tutorial for badges during Cycle 1, both of which was designed to familiarize employers with badges and the processes needed to assess and evaluate them.

The community raised an important question during the call: is an applicant who has earned badges a useful introduction to badges employers? Ideally, employers and hiring managers would have at least a basic understanding of badges before encountering a badge collection from a job applicant. As Carla Casilli pointed out during our discussion, much of our work has been focused on pushing badges from education out into the workforce. Now we need to focus more of our efforts on pushing badges from the workforce back into education, where employers recognize their need for a better way to evaluate applicants, adopt badges, and institutions of higher education start scaffolding programs around badges based on workforce requirements.

4. How could badges fit in with more traditional credentials and resume applications? As a supplement, or eventually replace other methods?

This question has been addressed more from an education perspective than from the workforce. For example, UC Davis and other institutions of higher education are using badges as a supplement to traditionally graded programs. Others are pushing the envelope, such as Dr. Bernard Bull at Concordia University Wisconsin, who has developed a master’s program in education technology based entirely on competency-based digital badges. As more educational bodies and institutions start to explore and adopt badges, we will see whether the trend is towards using badges as a supplement to or a substitute for traditional assessment and credentialing methods.

Contribute to this work!

If you have research or use cases relevant to the above questions, check out the call notes and email Carey with information you think might be useful to his ongoing work.

You can also join the conversation in the Open Badges Community Google Group or on Twitter by using the hashtag #openbadges.

Sunny Lee | The Open Badges Directory → Laying the foundation for cool open badges applications

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Thu Nov 13 2014 18:44:07 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Read the original post here.

**********************************************************************************

As open badges continues to gain a foothold in the world of digital credentialing and skills recognition, more and more folks have expressed interest in accessing a list of all the earnable open badges out in the wild. Earners, issuers and employers alike want to see the various badges available to earn based on certain search parameters, find out how to earn them and be directed to the appropriate places to dive deeper and start learning and earning.

One thing that the ecosystem was clearly in need of was a directory service that cataloged and listed all the open badges in the ecosystem with APIs that would enable other organizations to build cool applications on top, such as a badge-based pathway generator, an employer tool that facilitates connections with earners of certain badges, a badge or pathway discovery engine, etc.

In response, the Open Badges Directory Working Group was formed to precisely dedicate itself to prototyping this much-needed directory offering.

*** n.b. The documentation for the Open Badges directory can be found here: http://directory.openbadges.org and examples of it in use can be seen here: http://directory.openbadges.org/examples/browser/#/recent and here: http://achievery.com/discover.

image

In Cycle 1 of the Working Group, we had to figure out the scope of the project we wanted to tackle. The following were some of the questions we needed to answer to determine the MVP (Minimum Viable Product) feature set.

  • What are we listing?

  • What is the barrier to entry for badge issuers?

  • Where does the directory end and other potential 3rd party services begin?

I’ll share the line of reasoning we went through and where we netted out with each of these questions below.

What are we listing?

This seems like a simple question but actually is a bit more layered. This has to do with the way in which Open Badges technology is set up. The fundamental building block in the badging ecosystem is the assertion. The assertion describes 3 things;

  • who a badge was awarded to

  • what that badge represents —>  Badge Class

  • who issued the badge —> Issuer Organization

The assertion essentially ties all these 3 different pieces together in a unique badge instance that is tied to a specific badge earner.

*** n.b. More information can be found in this wiki guide written by Sue Smith.

In that case, what do we list?

  • Badge Instances that tie a badge class to an earner?

  • A general Badge Class that explains the badge?

  • Or do we also include issuer information in the directory too?

While there’s a case to be made for all three options, we decided that the MVP of the badge directory will simply list the Badge Class to start, with Badge Instance and potentially Issuer Organization as subsequent additions. This was because, while listing Badge Classes, depending on method of implementation, has a dependency on the Issuing organization, listing Badge Instances has a dependency on the Earner to make the badges they earn, public. We thought the latter was a bigger initial barrier that the directory would have to overcome as opposed to working with the issuers.

What is the barrier to entry for badge issuers? What does the badge issuing organization need to do in order to be a part of the directory?

This question presented us with a few options as well:

  1. Crawl the open web and look for the open badges assertion file type, automating the listing process for the issuer: While this option eliminates the barrier to entry for issuers, it is a resource intensive and expensive undertaking as the crawler would have to scour millions of IP addresses looking for certain file types. This didn’t seem like the right approach for the initial MVP.

  2. Issuers register their badge classes with the directory and provide the paths to where their badges are stored: This is the least developmentally intensive process but at the same time we are dependent on issuers to come to us and register their badges. The barrier to entry for issuers is put in place and we must provide them with a value proposition to register themselves and their badges.

  3. Issuers only register themselves and a simple crawler would know what domains and IPs to crawl: This is a bit of a hybrid solution of the above 2, utilizing crawling with minimal issuer cooperation. Even so, without a robust value proposition presented to issuers, we still have to reckon with the initial barrier of registration that they must overcome.

We opted for Option 2 in this initial iteration because it provided us with an opportunity to work collaboratively with the issuers in the ecosystem to highlight their badges and proof of concept the directory to a broader audience. Not only that, it saved us from overexpending our technical and development resources which would have been the case if we opted for Option 1.

However, we have seen rather slow responses from issuing organizations who want to register. We are in the process of evaluating the barrier(s) to entry, as well as the value proposition for issuers, in order to figure out next steps.

Where does the directory end and other potential third party services begin?

It’s easy to get excited about a directory offering because of its potential. Say I’m a learner and I want to find out what badges are out there that I can earn that will make me more competitive in the job market. I hear user experience design is a growing field, so I go to the directory, input a few keywords like ‘UX’, ‘user experience’, and ‘UI’ to see the list of badges in the ecosystem related to my search. What next? Does the directory offer me a cool UI with a list of various badge pathways around user experience design I can tackle? Can I save or favorite the badges presented so I can come back to them later?

What level of end-user experience will the directory enable? Are the cool, personalized experiences mentioned above, something an application on top of the directory creates while the directory is simply providing the service of listing open badges with some search and filtering?

Is there an end-user interfacing component to the directory at all or should it simply be a list of APIs for developers?

We all agree the API component of the directory will be critical for encouraging application development, but at the same time, we felt we needed some level of a UI to help folks understand and grasp the fundamental concept behind the directory. As such, what we ended up creating is a simple user interface that lists all badges with basic search and filter capability but nothing beyond that for now.

*** n.b. The API Explorer illustrates how the API works.

==========================

Having released this initial MVP that provides the broader ecosystem with a production beta version, we’re eager to continue development of the directory. Focus areas include the listing of badge instances in addition to badge classes, additional API endpoints, and exploring ways in which we can lower the barrier of entry while clearly articulating the value proposition for badge issuers.

There is still a lot more work left to do to have a full functioning directory product. But the prototype is a strong proof of concept and has taught us a ton. Needless to say, none of this could’ve been possible without the leadership, dedication and hard work of Kerri Lemoie from Achievery.

While Cycle 1 has ended, we still have an active mailing list, so please join the conversation!

The Open Badges Directory → Laying the foundation for cool open badges applications

Sunny Lee

Thu Nov 13 2014 18:30:11 GMT+0000 (UTC)

As open badges continues to gain a foothold in the world of digital credentialing and skills recognition, more and more folks have expressed interest in accessing a list of all the earnable open badges out in the wild. Earners, issuers and employers alike want to see the various badges available to earn based on certain search parameters, find out how to earn them and be directed to the appropriate places to dive deeper and start learning and earning.

One thing that the ecosystem was clearly in need of was a directory service that catalogued and listed all the open badges in the ecosystem with APIs that would enable other organizations to build cool applications on top, such as a badge-based pathway generator, an employer tool that facilitates connections with earners of certain badges, a badge or pathway discovery engine, etc.

In response, the Open Badges Directory Working Group was formed to precisely dedicate itself to prototyping this much-needed directory offering.

*** n.b. The documentation for the Open Badges directory can be found here: http://directory.openbadges.org and examples of it in use can be seen here: http://directory.openbadges.org/examples/browser/#/recent and here: http://achievery.com/discover.

In Cycle 1 of the Working Group, we had to figure out the scope of the project we wanted to tackle. The following were some of the questions we needed to answer to determine the MVP (Minimum Viable Product) feature set.

  • What are we listing?

  • What is the barrier to entry for badge issuers?

  • Where does the directory end and other potential 3rd party services begin?

I’ll share the line of reasoning we went through and where we netted out with each of these questions below.

What are we listing?

This seems like a simple question but actually is a bit more layered. This has to do with the way in which Open Badges technology is set up. The fundamental building block in the badging ecosystem is the assertion. The assertion describes 3 things;

  • who a badge was awarded to

  • what that badge represents —>  Badge Class

  • who issued the badge —> Issuer Organization

The assertion essentially ties all these 3 different pieces together in a unique badge instance that is tied to a specific badge earner.

*** n.b. More information can be found in this wiki guide written by Sue Smith: https://github.com/mozilla/openbadges/wiki/Assertion-Information-for-the-Uninitiated

In that case, what do we list?

  • Badge Instances that tie a badge class to an earner?

  • A general Badge Class that explains the badge?

  • Or do we also include issuer information in the directory too?

While there’s a case to be made for all three options, we decided that the MVP of the badge directory will simply list the Badge Class to start, with Badge Instance and potentially Issuer Organization as subsequent additions. This was because, while listing Badge Classes, depending on method of implementation, has a dependency on the Issuing organization, listing Badge Instances has a dependency on the Earner to make the badges they earn, public. We thought the latter was a bigger initial barrier that the directory would have to overcome as opposed to working with the issuers.

What is the barrier to entry for badge issuers? What does the badge issuing organization need to do in order to be a part of the directory?

This question presented us with a few options as well:

  1. Crawl the open web and look for the open badges assertion file type, automating the listing process for the issuer: While this option eliminates the barrier to entry for issuers, it is a resource intensive and expensive undertaking as the crawler would have to scour millions of IP addresses looking for certain file types. This didn’t seem like the right approach for the initial MVP.

  2. Issuers register their badge classes with the directory and provide the paths to where their badges are stored: This is the least developmentally intensive process but at the same time we are dependent on issuers to come to us and register their badges. The barrier to entry for issuers is put in place and we must provide them with a value proposition to register themselves and their badges.

  3. Issuers only register themselves and a simple crawler would know what domains and IPs to crawl: This is a bit of a hybrid solution of the above 2, utilizing crawling with minimal issuer cooperation. Even so, without a robust value proposition presented to issuers, we still have to reckon with the initial barrier of registration that they must overcome.

We opted for Option 2 in this initial iteration because it provided us with an opportunity to work collaboratively with the issuers in the ecosystem to highlight their badges and proof of concept the directory to a broader audience. Not only that, it saved us from overexpending our technical and development resources which would have been the case if we opted for Option 1.

However, we have seen rather slow responses from issuing organizations who want to register. We are in the process of evaluating the barrier(s) to entry, as well as the value proposition for issuers, in order to figure out next steps.

Where does the directory end and other potential third party services begin?

It’s easy to get excited about a directory offering because of its potential. Say I’m a learner and I want to find out what badges are out there that I can earn that will make me more competitive in the job market. I hear user experience design is a growing field, so I go to the directory, input a few keywords like ‘UX’, ‘user experience’, and ‘UI’ to see the list of badges in the ecosystem related to my search. What next? Does the directory offer me a cool UI with a list of various badge pathways around user experience design I can tackle? Can I save or favorite the badges presented so I can come back to them later?

What level of end-user experience will the directory enable? Are the cool, personalized experiences mentioned above, something an application on top of the directory creates while the directory is simply providing the service of listing open badges with some search and filtering?

Is there an end-user interfacing component to the directory at all or should it simply be a list of APIs for developers?

We all agree the API component of the directory will be critical for encouraging application development, but at the same time, we felt we needed some level of a UI to help folks understand and grasp the fundamental concept behind the directory. As such, what we ended up creating is a simple user interface that lists all badges with basic search and filter capability but nothing beyond that for now.

*** n.b. The API Explorer illustrates how the API works.

==========================

Having released this initial MVP that provides the broader ecosystem with a production beta version, we’re eager to continue development of the directory. Focus areas include the listing of badge instances in addition to badge classes, additional API endpoints, and exploring ways in which we can lower the barrier of entry while clearly articulating the value proposition for badge issuers.

There is still a lot more work left to do to have a full functioning directory product. But the prototype is a strong proof of concept and has taught us a ton. Needless to say, none of this could’ve been possible without the leadership, dedication and hard work of Kerri Lemoie from Achievery.

While Cycle 1 has ended, we still have an active mailing list, so please join the conversation!

 

#openbadgesMOOC Session 13: Policy Matters That Affect Open Badges

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Thu Nov 13 2014 16:38:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Badges: New Currency for Professional Credentials
Session 13: Policy Matters

Session Recording: coming soon!

This week, Anne Derryberry put forth the community-developed framework for developing institutional open badges policies which she participated in authoring as part of the Badge Alliance’s Policy Working Group. In addition, Mary Alice McCarthy, Senior Policy Analyst in the Education Policy Program at New America, presented a number of policy discussions occurring at the federal level within the U.S.

Why We Need An Institutional Policy Framework

Educational institutions around the world are exploring Open Badges for teaching and learning. The purpose of the Campus Policy Framework document is to inform the development of badge policies in higher education and to highlight important issues and areas for consideration, such as assessment, transcripting and publishing, intellectual property, privacy, and ethical / legal issues.

Policy is a broad area that can significantly impact badge uptake and effectiveness within postsecondary education. It includes institutional legal obligations, rights, ownership, federal and state government requirements, and local government regulations.

Peruse the document here: http://bit.ly/CampusPolicyBadges

Federal Policy Issues

Badges are part of a larger conversation around the need for more competency-based assessment and credentials at the federal level. That conversation is driven by three guiding principles, according to Mary Alice McCarthy: driving quality; ensuring equity; and protecting consumers and taxpayers.

image

A number of groups and organizations are conducting research into postsecondary education, assessment and credentials which could play a role in building support for open badges:

  • The Interagency Working Group on Expanded Measures of Enrollment and Attainment (GEMEnA) works to develop and validate national measures related to the participation in and credentialing of education and training for work (including work-readiness training, industry-recognized certifications, occupational licenses, and educational certificates), and to build government-wide consensus for the adoption of these measures in key federal data collections.
  • The Experimental Sites Initiative gives Congress a way to see how policies might work before they are implemented on a larger scale, hopefully mitigating unintended consequences, and could allow small groups to test badges before national policies are developed.
  • Other pilot programs under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act and Perkins might allow for research and exploration of badging programs before a large-scale policy implementation.

The Higher Education Academy also offers opportunities for investigating the potential benefits of open badges in higher education, as their focus is on securing support for competency-based education approaches and addressing quality assurance issues with non-traditional credentials.

McCarthy closed her presentation by reminding attendees that federal support of open badges will hinge upon the risks of creating a federal badging policy, and whether can the badging community can help policymakers see the relationship between technology and better credentials. The continuing work of the open badges community in key areas such as policy, higher education and workforce will be increasingly important as major players in the federal and regional policy landscape start to investigate the potential uses for open badges in postsecondary education.

What do you think? Join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #openbadgesMOOC

*********************************************

We look forward to continuing this course with you! See below for details of the next session.

Go to http://badges.coursesites.com/ to access more resources, information, and challenge assignments to earn badges.

*********************************************

Future sessions:

Monday, Dec. 8, 2-3pm ET:
Open Badges Review - Sunny Lee and Jade Forester

New Digitial Badges Report from the Alliance for Excellent Education

Re-mediating Assessment

Mon Nov 10 2014 20:06:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)

By Gina Howard and James Willis 

We are excited to share our recent recognition on the first page of the new Alliance for Excellent Education report, Digital Badge Systems: The Promise and Potential by Kamila Thigpen. The Alliance for Excellent Education is a national organization that focuses on ensuring all students have an equal opportunity at graduating from high school and having the necessary preparation to succeed in college, work, and citizenship. Based out of Washington, DC, the organization focuses on developing and implementing federal and national policies that, “support effective high school reform and increased student achievement and attainment.”


Read more »

Badger Beats: The Week In Review [65]

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Fri Nov 07 2014 14:47:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Happy Friday!

There’s been a lot going on this week - our team and community have been presenting at the AECT 2014 Annual Convention, Open Ed Conference and iNACOL Symposium, while others have been wrapping up their MozFest activities and more are preparing to present at Deakin University’s National Forum.

Here’s a summary of some of the other great stuff that happened this week:

March of the Robots delivered activities and workshops for thousands of people in Leeds in the UK, as well as hanging out at MozFest with us. Read more on the Digital Me blog!

Here are some great shots of the CubeBot in action with the kids on the badges floor:

image

image

Open Badges Community Project Call, Nov. 5, 2014

Mozilla Open Badges Blog

Thu Nov 06 2014 16:58:08 GMT+0000 (UTC)

Open Badges Community Project Call, Nov. 5, 2014:

Speakers:

Agenda: http://bit.ly/CC-Nov5

This week we heard from community members in three different countries - it’s great to see these community calls going truly global. Dr. Devedzic and his colleague Dr. Jelena Jovanovic presented on the October 15th community call on their GRASS (grading soft skills) project based in Estonia. He joined us again this week to share his experiences from the Belgrade Job Fair, where he and another colleague gave an Open Badges presentation to a group of employers and students (primarily from technical fields).

Introducing European students and employers to badges

Badges are still relatively new in Serbia, as in much of Europe. Dr. Devedzic reported that students’ reactions were mostly positive, whereas employers were generally more cautious. Employers had to be approached “with more care” and Dr. Devedzic believes that ongoing efforts to raise awareness and introduce employers to examples of badges being used in the workplace will encourage acceptance and adoption.

Students were interested to learn more about badge validity, trusted issuers, issuing criteria, validity of evidence, and the number of badges earned - questions many of us are familiar with when introducing badges to new audiences. Employers also asked about the potential to forge badges, as well as the sustainability of the concept in the long term, and some expressed reluctance to the idea overall. There were also concerns about candidates coming to them with hundreds of badges, before badge collections and sharing options were explained.

In a region where personal connections often open more doors than skills sharing, Dr. Devedzic argues “a greater campaign is necessary in order to make employers here aware of the benefits of badges.” Ongoing contact with employers will be important as awareness and adoption of badges spreads throughout Europe. There is another big promotional event in Belgrade scheduled for the spring of 2015, where Dr. Devedzic has been invited to talk about Open Badges - we look forward to hearing more updates after that.

To learn more about the GRASS Project that Dr. Devedzic and Dr. Jovanovic are leading, go to https://sites.google.com/site/llpgrassproject/

Badging conversations with Dr. Dan Hickey & Dr. James Willis

In the hour before Wednesday’s community call, Dan and James led a discussion on how major learning management systems are incorporating digital badges, the entrepreneurial and university-based support system emerging around this new feature, and examples of badge-induced transformation and disruption. Learn more here.

Dan Hickey’s team developed a modest initial badging integration for Open edX, and are planning to figure out how to build the functionality into downloadable instances for future uses, working towards making it possible for anyone using it to issue badges using the platform.

Here is a blog post on Dan Hickey’s musings about scaling up badge systems from a non-technologists perspective : http://remediatingassessment.blogspot.com/2014/11/the-design-knowledge-evaporation.html

Next week, Dan will be presenting in Australia at the Curate, Credential and Carry Forward Digital Learning Evidence National Forum being held at Deakin University and then the Open edX Conference in Boston, Mass.

Learn more about Indiana University’s COIL (Center for Online Learning and Innovation) here: http://coil.psu.edu

Badges for Digital Leaders in the UK

Educators in the UK have been working to recognize youth digital leaders using badges, based on an open framework for skills and knowledge for digital leadership.

Chris Sharples worked with Digital Me’s Tim Riches and Lucy Neale, as well as the team at Makewaves, to develop levels of Digital Leader Badges. Chris has awarded badges to 25 digital leaders in his North Yorkshire school, and has found that the primary challenge facing schools working to award badges to students is that IT staff are often very busy and don’t have the resources to maintain and monitor the badging process.

Chris has kept an ongoing record of the work being done on his blog: http://www.gr8ict.com/digitalleaders/

There is also a weekly #dlchat Twitter conversation held every Thursday at 4pm EST / 9pm GMT. In October, our Marketing + Community Manager Jade Forester led a badges-themed chat, and we’d love to get more members of the badging community involved in a future Twitter chat. Contact Jade if you’d like to join!